Why I Do Not Use Bee Products In My Formulations. - Obvs Skincare

Why I Do Not Use Bee Products In My Formulations.

I have nothing against local, sustainable beekeepers who encourage the population of bees. Personally, I avoid anything that contains bee products if I do not know where the bee product has come from. Here are some bee products to look out for in your skincare. Obvs Skincare uses vegan alternatives to these bee products, to avoid any doubt. 
 
Beeswax (cera alba) – Bees release wax to construct honeycombs, which are used to grow larvae and store honey and pollen. Humans obtained it by cutting it out of beehives. Beeswax is used as an emollient, emulsifier, and film forming agent in some cosmetics. I use Candellia Wax instead.
 
Honey (mel) – Bees make food for the hive by collecting nectar from honeydew flowers and storing it in honeycombs. Beekeepers extract honey from the hive by removing the honeycomb. Honey is frequently removed from the honeycomb after that. Honey is used in some cosmetics as a humectant, moisturiser, and calming agent. I use Organic Unrefined Shea Butter instead.
 
Propolis (bee glue) – Tree resins and bee digestive fluids mixed together. Bees use it as a construction material to seal minor gaps and reinforce the hive. Propolis is used in toothpaste, shampoos, deodorants, and other cosmetics as an antiseborrheic, moisturising, and soothing agent, as well as as an antibacterial agent. I use Organic Safflower Oil instead.
 
Bee Pollen – For reproductive functions, seed-bearing plants' blooms create a powder (transmission from plant to plant either air-borne or carried by animals). Bees collect it and use it to feed their larvae. Pollen traps were used to collect the pollen (meshed wire devices in the beehive entrance that strip the pollen off the legs of the bees returning home; legs and wings can be torn off in the process). Bee pollen is used as a skin conditioner in cosmetics. I use Unrefined Organic Shea Butter instead.
 
Royal Jelly – Secretion produced by worker bee glands. Used to feed a bee colony's larvae, particularly the queen larvae. Royal jelly is obtained by specialised beekeepers who remove queens from hives on a regular basis and replace them with new queen larvae for which royal jelly is made. The regular replacement of larvae and removal of jelly results in an unrealistically steady output. In cosmetics, royal jelly is used as a skin conditioner. I use Unrefined Organic Shea Butter instead.
 
 
 
 
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